Warp, Weft, and Way

A Group Blog of Chinese and Comparative Philosophy

Dao Annual Best Essay Award

The deliberation of Dao Annual Best Essay Award 2010 has comes to a conclusion. The process was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we formed a selection/nomination committee consisting of three editorial board members, who went through all main articles published in the four issues of Dao in 2010 and selected the following three articles as the finalists:

KIM Myeong-seok, “What Ceyin zhi xin (Compassion/Familial Affection) Really Is”
Tan Sor-hoon, “Authoritative Master Kong (Confucius) in an Authoritarian Age”
James Behuniak, “John Dewey and the Virtue of Cook Ding’s Dao.”

Congratulations to Drs. Kim, Tan, and Behuniak!

At the second stage, these three articles were presented to the whole editorial board, and each editorial board member was asked to provide a ranking of these three articles. As a result, Dr. Kim Myeong-seok’s paper receives the highest ranking. So the award goes to Dr. Kim, who is currently an assistant professor of philosophy at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul.

Congratulations, Dr. Kim!

As in the past, we will organize a panel discussion at Eastern APA Annual Meeting at the end of the year, where a certificate of the award, together with a check of $1000, will be presented to the award winner. The award information will be posted both at the site of our journal (http://www.kutztown.edu/academics/liberal_arts/philosophy/dao.htm) and that of our publisher (http://www.springer.com/philosophy/journal/11712), and the award winning essay will be set for free access at the website of our publisher, Springer (http://www.springerlink.com/content/1540-3009).

The following is the official citation of the award winning essay, adapted from the description provided by the nomination/selection committee:

KIM Myeong-seok, “What Ceyin zhi xin (Compassion/Familial Affection) Really Is?” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2010): 407-425

Cogently connecting the idea of ceyin zhi xin to pertinent current western philosophical conceptions of emotions, Kim sheds on it a new and comparative light by arguing that it should be understood as a concern-based, cognitive construal. Marshaling rich evidentiary resources from the Mengzi itself and other texts, Kim advances his new interpretation while judiciously accommodating and critiquing previous commentators on Mencian thinking. His essay shows a firm command of the original texts and secondary readings and demonstrates sensitive and reasonable use of western analytic constructs. It is a significant contribution to the study of Mengzi in particular and Confucian moral psychology in general.

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March 19, 2011 - Posted by | Chinese philosophy

2 Comments »

  1. Kim’s article doesn’t appear to be freely accessible yet. Any idea when we can expect it? (I have a special interest because I’m trying to finalise something specifically about the ceyin zhi xin.)

    Comment by Dan Robins | March 24, 2011 | Reply

  2. I will urge our publisher, Springer, to do it as quickly as possible. I shall post a notice here when I know it is set for free.

    By the way, just for your information (particularly for those who have published in Dao before), our publisher has a real time record of article downloads from our journal in the past week, month, and quarter. It also has a record of five most downloaded articles (including the number of downloads of each of these five articles) in the past week, month, and quarter. For example,

    In the past week, these are five top downloaded articles:
    21. Family Love in Confucius and Mencius, An, Yanming
    18. Xunzi and the Prudence of Dao: Desire as the Motive to Become Good, Hagen, Kurtis
    11. The Ideal of Harmony in Ancient Chinese and Greek Philosophy, Li, Chenyang.
    11. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide from Confucian Moral Perspectives, Lo, Ping-cheung,
    11. Metaphor and Meaning in Early China, Slingerland, Edward

    In the past month, these are the most downloaded articles:
    52. A Confucian Perspective on Abortion, Ivanhoe, Philip J.
    51. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide from Confucian Moral Perspectives, Lo Ping-cheung
    50. Metaphor and Meaning in Early China, Slingerland, Edward
    44. Xunzi and the Prudence of Dao: Desire as the Motive to Become Good, Hagen, Kurtis
    31, Two Senses of Justice: Confucianism, Rawls, and Comparative Political Philosophy, Cline, Erin M.

    In the past quarter, these are five most downloaded articles:
    1043. A Dao of Technology? Allen, Barry
    138. A Confucian Perspective on Abortion, Ivanhoe, Philip J.
    118. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide from Confucian Moral Perspectives, Lo Ping-cheung
    108. Metaphor and Meaning in Early China, Slingerland, Edward
    87. Xunzi and the Prudence of Dao: Desire as the Motive to Become Good. Hagen, Kurtis

    You can get the real time updates on these at the following link:

    http://www.springer.com/philosophy/journal/11712#realtime

    Comment by Yong Huang | March 26, 2011 | Reply


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