Warp, Weft, and Way

A Group Blog of Chinese and Comparative Philosophy

Australasian Philosophical Review: Call for Abstracts

Call for abstracts

Australasian Philosophical Review (APR), Vol 1 Issue 3:
Comparative Ancient Chinese and Ancient Greek philosophy

Author: G. E. R. Lloyd, “The Fortunes of Analogy”

Invited commentaries from: Lisa Raphals, Adriane Rini, Raoul Mortley

Committee: Karyn Lai, Loy Hui Chieh, Michaelis Michael

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The APR is seeking proposals for commentaries on Professor G.E.R. Lloyd’s article, “The Fortunes of Analogy”.

Abstracts should be brief (100-500 words), stating clearly the aspects of the target article that will be discussed, together with an indication of the line that will be taken. More details are available at the APR website: http://australasianphilosophicalreview.org/1.3

Those who are interested should register as commentators to view Professor Lloyd’s paper and the invited commentaries.

Abstract submissions for Volume 1 Issue 3 should be sent to apr@aap.org.au by 15 October 2016.

Invitations to write commentaries of 2000-3000 words will be issued on 31st October 2016. Full-length commentaries will be due on 15th January 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact Karyn Lai

September 14, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

International Conference: In pursuit of wisdom: Ancient Chinese and Greek perspectives on cultivation

15-18 January 2016
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

Conference website: https://cultivationinchinaandgreece.wordpress.com/

What does it take to live well? Ancient Chinese and Greek philosophy present accounts or models of life lived well: a Confucian junzi, a Daoist sage and a eudaimonic life. Philosophical discussions in these traditions bring to light pictures of the good life as well as its constitutive elements. These include, for example, the Stoic life of virtue, Aristotelian intellectual virtues, Confucian virtue ethics, and Daoist ideals of nonaction. Yet, living well is not simply about having the right kinds of pursuits or ends nor is it just about how particular activities are executed. The good life is primarily about agency, and a richer account is facilitated by understanding how it is cultivated. At this conference, we aim to extend existing debates on the good life by investigating the processes associated with cultivating or nurturing the self in order to live such lives, ably and reliably… (read more at the Conference website: https://cultivationinchinaandgreece.wordpress.com)

Keynote Speakers

Professor Sophie-Grace Chappell, The Open University, UK, editor of Intuition, Theory and Anti-Theory in Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2015) and author of Knowing What To Do: Imagination, Virtue, and Platonism in Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2014) and Reading Plato’s Theatetus (Hackett, 2005)

Professor Yahei Kanayama, Nagoya University, Japan, author of numerous articles in Greek philosophy, especially on Plato, and translator of Greek philosophical texts such as all the works of Sextus Empiricus (Kyoto University Press, 1998, 2004, 2006, 2010, together with Mariko Kanayama).

Professor Poo, Mu-chou, Chinese University of Hong Kong, editor of Rethinking Ghosts in World Religions (Brill, 2009) and author of Enemies of Civilization: Attitudes toward Foreigners in Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt and China (SUNY, 2005) and In Search of Personal Welfare: A View of Ancient Chinese Religion (SUNY: 1998).

Professor Lisa A. Raphals, University of California, Riverside, USA, author of Divination and Prediction in Early China and Ancient Greece (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and Sharing the Light: Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China, (SUNY, 1998).

Professor Wang Keping, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, PRC, author of Reading the Dao: A Thematic Inquiry (Continuum Publishing, 2011) and Spirit of Chinese Poetics (Beijing Foreign Languages Press, 2008).

 

Paper or Panel Proposals

We invite paper or panel proposals, submitted on the Registration Form (available for download from the conference website

Papers are allocated 20 mins for presentation with 15 mins for discussion. Panels may be grouped in twos or threes.

The due date for Paper and Panel proposals is 15 November 2015.
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Conference Organisers

 

August 23, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

Postdoc Fellowships at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

This is a highly competitive fellowship with a generous stipend. Scholars who have been awarded their PhDs not after January 2011, or who are expecting the award of their degree imminently, are eligible to apply: https://research.unsw.edu.au/vice-chancellor%E2%80%99s-postdoctoral-research-fellowships

Applicants should have publications in peer-reviewed scholarly journals and with reputable publishers. They should also discuss future publishing plans. The application pack is available here: https://research.unsw.edu.au/document/unsw_vc_fellowships_application_pack.pdf

If you have questions about a post-doc fellowship in Chinese philosophy, please contact A/Prof Karyn Lai (k.lai@unsw.edu.au)

May 5, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

The UPDirectory: Directory of Philosophers from Underrepresented Groups in Philosophy

From http://www.underrepresentedphilosophers.com/.

A Directory listing is currently being compiled; the list will include philosophers previously listed in the Women of Philosophy Directory, The Black Philosophers Directory, The Asian Philosophers Directory, the Latina/o and Hispanic Philosophers Directory, etc.

All of these individual directories are now being combined into a single directory of philosophers from underrepresented groups in philosophy — the UPDirectory. The UPDirectory will replace the individual directories, which will not be published. Nonetheless, all the information from each individual directory will be contained in the UPDirectory. The goal of the directory is to have a single, easy-to-use resource for people who want to learn more about the work of philosophers who belong to underrepresented groups in philosophy.

For technical reasons, we need new entries from everyone, even from those who already filled out information for a previous directory. If you would like to be included in the new UPDirectory, please click on the link below

http://www.underrepresentedphilosophers.com/updirectory-entry-submission-form/

which will take you to an Entry Re-submission Form. When you’ve completed the form, please click on the ‘Submit’ button. That’s all you need to do to appear in the UPDirectory! We ask that you fill out this form by November 27th. Please note that participation is fully voluntary, and you need not provide any information you do not wish to include in your entry.

November 2, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

The UPDirectory: Directory of Philosophers from Underrepresented Groups in Philosophy

From http://www.underrepresentedphilosophers.com/.

A Directory listing is currently being compiled; the list will include philosophers previously listed in the Women of Philosophy Directory, The Black Philosophers Directory, The Asian Philosophers Directory, the Latina/o and Hispanic Philosophers Directory, etc.

All of these individual directories are now being combined into a single directory of philosophers from underrepresented groups in philosophy — the UPDirectory. The UPDirectory will replace the individual directories, which will not be published. Nonetheless, all the information from each individual directory will be contained in the UPDirectory. The goal of the directory is to have a single, easy-to-use resource for people who want to learn more about the work of philosophers who belong to underrepresented groups in philosophy.

For technical reasons, we need new entries from everyone, even from those who already filled out information for a previous directory. If you would like to be included in the new UPDirectory, please click on the link below

http://www.underrepresentedphilosophers.com/updirectory-entry-submission-form/

which will take you to an Entry Re-submission Form. When you’ve completed the form, please click on the ‘Submit’ button. That’s all you need to do to appear in the UPDirectory! We ask that you fill out this form by November 27th. Please note that participation is fully voluntary, and you need not provide any information you do not wish to include in your entry.

November 2, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

UNSW Australia Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

The University of New South Wales’ Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowships scheme (2015) is open. These highly competitive awards are targeted at early career researchers of exceptional calibre wishing to conduct full-time research at UNSW.

Fellowships will be offered for a period of 2 years, renewable for a third year subject to conditions being met; a UNSW academic salary (taxable) will be provided; a research support grant of A$10,000 per annum will be provided to assist with research costs.

Please refer to the conditions of the award at:

https://research.unsw.edu.au/vice-chancellor%E2%80%99s-postdoctoral-research-fellowships

and

https://research.unsw.edu.au/document/unsw_vc_postdoctoral_fellowships_application_pack.pdf

May 6, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

Knowing to (act): Confucian situationist epistemology

The Lunyu’s conversations highlight and advocate a wide variety of the junzi’s commitments, dispositions, efficacy, responsiveness, and so on. Many of these focus on a person’s encounters with situations and, therein, one’s appropriate responses to the question, or undertaking of the task, at hand. From an epistemological point of view, how might we best capture these situationist capabilities and competencies?

There are at least three ways of making sense of the junzi’s situationist capacities/knowledge. There are probably more conceptual frameworks, including some plausible combinations of the three below:

(I)                The knowing-how route

This account grows out from the knowing-how/knowing-that distinction. Here, we could cast the junzi’s capacities as practical, in-situ, knowledge, or knowledge manifest in situations. Generally, the focus of accounts set out within this framework would include parameters such as competence, practice, and reliability, to name a few. Of course, there can be more subtle versions of this approach, including those that shatter the dichotomy of knowing-how/knowing that. Included in these approaches is the ‘knowing-to act in the moment’ account that I have argued for (which can be both act- and agent-centred).

 

(II)             The pragmatism route

Here, again, there is a focus on the practical and, indeed, the contextual element. This account dwells centrally on encounters with and/or responses to particular situations. The vocabulary for a pragmatist account of Confucianist epistemology could include: imaginative encounters in context, inquiry and problem-solving, and reinventing tradition. Could it be that the pragmatist route is, in some versions of pragmatism, only programmatic? I ask this question because I’m not sure.

 

(III)           Virtue epistemology

This framework, arising from the impetus to represent Confucian ethics as virtue ethics, has attracted some concerns that a situationist epistemology is incompatible with a virtues-based approach to character. There have been some attempts to deal with that in the literature, especially from a Confucian perspective. (I personally think this is not an insurmountable problem for Confucian ethics). Does this account ‘capture’ Confucian epistemology better than the other two?

 

I’m keen to find out: (a) whether there are other viable conceptual schemes for a situationist epistemology; and (b) whether there are good reasons to think why any one of these, or some such combination, is more plausible than others. Amongst other things, I’m curious about the overlaps across these frameworks and I wonder if scholars working within some of them (myself included) might be re-inventing the wheel by not investigating more broadly. If so, might this be a case of philosophy’s fragmentation into many sub-areas that don’t necessarily speak to each other—with significant implications for those of us in comparative philosophical research.

August 17, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

International graduate student scholarships at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

These are generous scholarships–3 years’ duration for a PhD and 2 years for an MA–which pays the tuition fee and an annual stipend of $24,653 to successful applicants.

The scholarships are for PhD and Masters research. Closing date: 1st March 2013.

If you’re interested in submitting a proposal for research in Chinese philosophy, please get in touch with A/Prof Karyn Lai (k.lai@unsw.edu.au) as the proposal will need the support of the supervisor.

More details of the scholarship are available at: http://research.unsw.edu.au/sites/all/files/related_files/regular_page_content/international_scholarship_guidelines.pdf?t=1360177126

February 6, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

Practicising to know: Practicalism and Confucian philosophy

This article “Practicising to know: Practicalism and Confucian philosophy” is co-authored by me and one of my colleagues, Stephen Hetherington, an advocate of a version of knowing-how (a version he names ‘Practicalism’). In this paper, we explore how Confucian philosophy lends support to Practicalism.

Practising to Know: Practicalism and Confucian Philosophy. Co-authored with Stephen Hetherington. Published in Philosophy, July 2012, 87 : pp 375-393. Copyright © The Royal Institute of Philosophy 2012. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0031819112000289.

Abstract:

For a while now, there has been much conceptual discussion about the respective natures of knowledge-that and knowledge-how, along with the intellectualist idea that knowledge-how is really a kind of knowledge-that. Gilbert Ryle put in place most of the terms that have so far been distinctive of that debate, when he argued for knowledge-how’s conceptual distinctness from knowledge-that. But maybe those terms should be supplemented, expanding the debate. In that spirit, the conceptual option of practicalism has recently entered the fray. Practicalism conceives anew the nature of knowledge-that, as being a kind of knowledge-how. In this paper we enlarge upon this conceptual suggestion. We draw from an ancient Chinese text, the Analects of Confucius, explaining how it lends some support to practicalism.

 

July 12, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | 13 Comments

Australasian Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy conference: call for papers and conference registration

ASACP Conference 2012

University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

9-11 July 2012

Conference Theme: Relationships in Asian and Comparative Philosophy

 Keynote Speaker: Professor Roger Ames, University of Hawai’i

During his visit, Professor Ames will speak at the Art Gallery of New South Wales on the topic of “Landscape and Traveling in the Confucian Dynamics of Intergenerational Transmission” on Saturday 7th July (time to be confirmed) and will present a UNSW Confucius Institute Public Lecture on “Confucian Role Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism” on Tuesday 10th July (http://www.confuciusinstitute.unsw.edu.au/china-talks/2012/china-talks-distinguished-speaker-roger-ames).

The conference committee invites submissions of proposals for papers in all areas of Asian and Comparative Philosophy and associated disciplines, especially on the topic of relationships. At this conference, there will also be a focus on the following streams:

Continue reading

May 24, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

Australasian Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy Conference, July 9-11 2012, Sydney, Australia.

ASACP Conference 2012
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
9-11 July 2012

Conference Theme: Relationships in Asian and Comparative Philosophy

Keynote Speaker: Professor Roger Ames, University of Hawai’i

The conference committee invites submissions of proposals for papers in all areas of Asian and Comparative Philosophy especially on the topic of relationships, although there will also be a focus on the following streams:

Ethics, Personhood and Relationships
Ethics, Environment and Development
Knowledge, Action and Fallibility
Methodology in Comparative Philosophy
Comparative East Asian and South Asian Philosophies

Continue reading

April 15, 2012 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

International Research Candidate Scholarships at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

UNSW offers scholarships to international research candidates (Masters, PhD) of exceptional research potential to undertake a higher degree by research. Tuition Fee Scholarships are available for PhD, Masters by Research and Master of Philosophy (in selected disciplines depending on Faculty research areas). Some scholarship schemes also provide a living allowance.

If you are interested in applying for a scholarship to conduct MA or PhD research in Chinese philosophy, please contact Dr Karyn Lai (k.lai@unsw.edu.au) for more information. The closing date for applications is 31st August, 2011, so please act quickly!

More information on the scholarship is available at: http://research.unsw.edu.au/international-research-candidate-scholarships.

July 27, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment

What does it mean to know li (zhili 知禮) in the Lunyu—knowing how?

The four passages on 知禮 in the Lunyu: 3.15, 3.22, 7.31, 20.3 shed some light on 知—is it knowing how, knowing that, or some combination of them, or perhaps a different kind of knowing?

In 7.31, Confucius himself is challenged. Perhaps here we see an ordering (prioritisation) of li? Confucius is challenged again in 3.15. This is a really interesting case: the person who has observed Confucius asking questions at the Hall presumes that Confucius does so because he lacks knowledge. On this basis, he asks if Confucius actually knows li. Confucius’ response turns the tables on the inquirer. To ask questions (i.e. what he was doing then) is not a sign of not knowing that; it is in fact a manifestation of knowing-how to perform li (it is an act of respect or courtesy by a visitor to the Hall to show interest in its details).

In 3.22, Confucius judges that Guanzhong does not know li — on the basis that he has failed to manifest the appropriate li in court. Hence, Confucius asks the rhetorical question concerning whether Guanzhong did really know li.

So here we’ve got some evidence that knowing how is necessary for zhili in these two conversations. *Perhaps even necessary and sufficient in 3.22? (I’m just not sure about this point, though—and I’d like to hear what others think.).

June 19, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | 21 Comments

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Sydney, Australia (2012 – )

UNSW invites applications for a limited number of Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in 2012, to be awarded to early career researchers of exceptional calibre wishing to conduct full-time research at UNSW in any of its areas of research strengths.

* Applicants must have been awarded a PhD confer dated (on testamur); no earlier than 1 January 2007 or later than 31st December 2010.

* Fellows will be appointed at Academic Salary Level A (A$71K – $76K) or Level B (A$80K- $85K) per year (plus 17% employer superannuation and leave loading) based on years of experience. A Research Support Grant of A$10,000 per annum for three years will be provided on commencement. The University’s employment conditions apply to the Fellowships, including such entitlements as relocation allowance on appointment.

* Fellowships will be offered for a period of 2 years, renewable for a third year subject to research performance in the top 25% of their level of appointment and evidence of actively seeking externally funded fellowships.

Please contact Karyn Lai (k.lai@unsw.edu.au) for research in Chinese Philosophy.

More details are available at: https://research.unsw.edu.au/2012_VCFellowships

June 19, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy | Leave a comment